Website Monetization: Affiliate Ad Networks, Paywalls and Donations

If you are looking to make money from your website, you should consider at least one of these three monetization models: affiliate ad networks, paywalls, or donations. Each model has its upsides and downsides, and knowing which one to use depends on the sort of content your website produces.

Paywalls
Paywalls work by forcing a user to pay to access your website. As far as website monetization goes, this technique is the most straightforward. It’s easy to explain and easy to understand.

However, its bluntness and simplicity doesn’t work for every website. What’s more, a hard paywall — where the user can’t even get past the landing page without paying — only works in certain circumstances.

The Times and the Wall Street Journal have both survived behind hard paywalls, but these are huge international newspapers. People are willing to pay for their insight into the news because they know, due to each paper’s respective reputation, that they can’t get this analysis anywhere else.


Soft paywalls work by allowing users a little peek behind the paywall before having to pay. Sometimes, this comes in the form of a handful of free articles, whilst at other times it comes in the form of a free trial. However websites choose to do it, the aim is to turn those trials into paying subscribers.


Best Paywall? Netflix

The rise, fall, and rise again of Netflix is a fascinating story and the business is not credited enough for it. What started off as a somewhat successful film-by-mail service started to move online when it saw the trend approaching.

Not everyone agreed with Netflix’s move, though, with some journalists mocking the decision at the time. David Pogue had this to say about it:


When the pundits tell you that the death of the DVD is imminent, that we’ll soon get all our movies instantaneously from the Internet, some skepticism is in order.”

Just over ten years later, that comment remains a fascinating time capsule of the doubt surrounding Netflix’s venture into this new market. A decade on, Netflix’s profits have soared and it’s all down to its paywall monetization model.


By hiding exclusive content behind a paywall, such as House of Cards and the many other films and TV shows Netflix hosts and distributes, it makes sure that an equivalent product cannot be found anywhere else.

As well as this, Netflix also uses a soft paywall in the form of a free trial to let people see what they’re missing without it. Data shows that, after a Netflix free trial, one in every three people stay on afterwards.

Voluntary Subscriptions and Donations

Rather than force your users to pay, why not just ask them nicely? Allow them to use as much of your content as they want for free and let them pay if they feel like it. If they don’t, that’s okay. The people who do pay help to fund the content for those who can’t afford to right now.

It sounds crazy, right? It sounds like the kind of wishful thinking that only a child could imagine would work. Yet, it’s really, really not. It’s the driving idea behind the Guardian’s monetization model, as well as the legions of internet creators who use Patreon to fund their various projects.

Best Donation Model? Wikipedia

By far the best example of a donation model working — and working extremely well — comes from the oldest player in this particular game: Wikipedia. Not only has Wikipedia survived under the donation model, it has become the 13th biggest website in the world, according to SimilarWeb, and raises more money with each fundraiser.

Wikipedia has been doing this successfully for a long time as well. The website launched in January 2001 and, by July, it already had 6,000 articles — despite looking like this. By mid-2010, it looked more or less as it does today and had over three million articles in English and millions of others in hundreds of other languages. Today, Wikipedia has over 40 million articles in 293 languages, according to its own data.

Affiliate Ad Networks

Affiliate ad networks work by introducing advertisers to website owners, so that neither party has to do the unwanted legwork. It’s because of this legwork that affiliate ad networks are vital to online marketing and website monetization.

For advertisers, affiliate ad networks use vast amounts of data to place the right advert on the right website at the right time so that it can target the right person. The success of affiliate ad networks is evident in the faith some of the biggest brands in the world place in them.

Even luxury brands such as Agent Provocateur, Barneys New York, Burberry, and Liberty London — once seen as beyond the marketing methods of mass appeal brands — use affiliate marketing to get their message out online.

For website owners, affiliate ad networks are great because they allow people to start making money right away. After you’ve signed up to the network and inputted the code into your website, you can start earning revenue on the ads placed on your website. The best affiliate marketing networks can guarantee you the best quality of ads.

Best Affiliate Ad Network? Adsterra


Offering payments in Bitcoin as well as a range of other methods, Adsterra is the best affiliate ad network out there because of the range of data it uses to deliver the best possible service for both advertisers and website owners. It can guarantee safe ads placed in the correct geo locations. It’s even able to use data such as which smartphone someone is using when they access your website.

All of this culminates in high-quality ads with high click-through rates. That’s good for advertisers, but it’s also good for website owners and users, too. Adsterra became the affiliate ad network with 10 billion ad impressions a month by understanding that the relationship between advertising and business works best when it works for everyone.

Collaboration

Entering Giveaways – Can They Really Boost Your Income?

Entering Giveaways – A Valid Source Of Income? I’m here today to answer that question.

I’ve been entering competitions here in the UK for a good four or five years now – and I wasn’t adverse to entering them before either, often encouraged by my father and grandmother. Giveaways and competitions are quite a bit different over here rather than the USA as we don’t have to pay tax on prize wins – which is quite lucky when you win something big!

Plenty of people have spoken about giveaways being a valid source with which to boost your income. I’m not so sure. Yes, it can definitely supplement your income. I managed to win £400 worth of saucepans and cookware just before we were moving into this house – that saved us plenty of ££ when we finally moved in. I’ve won an iPad which we had planned on buying anyway – so it is obvious to see that they can supplement your income in this way.

Boosting your income is different. The only way I would say that competitions and giveaways boost your income are if you win cash or you sell your wins. I’m not sure about the US – it seems like it may be deemed okay to sell on wins there – David from Young Adult Money posted about making money from entering giveaways – but here in the UK, it is frowned upon by the ‘comping’ community – there are some people who enter for everything and sell it all, their Ebay pages full of a complete mismatch of new and unsealed items.

Entering Giveaways | Can They Really Boost Your Income? | Discussion | www.keeneonsaving.co.uk

I will admit I have sold the odd thing – a runners up prize that I don’t want or something we’ve had our use of (so sell it second hand) or something we just can’t get on with. I try not to do it too often though and only really enter for what I want or what I know those close to me would appreciate. I rarely find the time to sit there entering giveaways nowadays so I am very selective with what I enter – cash, vouchers, children’s prizes, wedding prizes – these are my main competitions of choice.

What do I think in conclusion?

Whilst cash wins and selling prizes can help you to boost your income, it isn’t a reliable income stream as you cannot ever be sure you will win that prize that you can then sell for £££. You would need to be entering hundreds of competitions a day to have any chance of winning enough cash or winning enough decent items to sell for a decent income.

If you are entering competitions to enrich your day to day life by entering for things you would love but can’t afford nor justify, then great. Competitions and giveaways are a great source for supplementing your income and treating yourself to items you probably couldn’t justify buying. So for those people that say entering giveaways really boost your income – I’d say no, they can’t. They can certainly supplement it and very occasionally boost it with a really good win – but overall, it just isn’t a reliable enough income stream.

What Can I Do With My Old Books?

Old books. We all have them. We sometimes want to get rid of them. But what can we do with them?

I have more than enough books to contend with and a very embarrassing to-be-read pile. But I also have those books I know and love and will keep forever. But what about those books that you’ve read once or twice but no longer need in your life? Those books that are just taking up valuable space. Here are my top suggestions:

Donate them

There are plenty of places to donate your old books. Charity shops, local events (we have a little coffee morning ‘Pop-In’ in my village where you can give your old stuff – I’ve bought many an old book here!).

Sell them

There are plenty of places you can sell your old books – but you may not get much for them. Car boot sales, Facebook selling pages, Ebay and book specific websites such as WeBuyBooks are the best places, although you may only get pennies.

What Can I Do With My Old Books | Tips | www.keeneonsaving.co.uk

Get them valued

You never know, you could be hiding a rare first edition in there. Obviously this would require checking through the books first but should you come across a rare first edition of a book, you could be quids in.

Give them away

If your family and friends are anything like mine, then they will always love and appreciate books that are new to them. Half of my collection have been given to me over the years by my family and friends and I guess that most of theirs have been too. That way you can always borrow one back if you decide you really want to read it again.

Make art

I actually don’t agree with this one at all as I hate people even writing in books and defacing them let alone this. But people make these wonderful pieces of artwork out of old, unwanted books. Much as I appreciate the beauty, it is something I could never do to my old books.

 

What do you do with any books you no longer want?